Go tip of the day : running tests for all subpackages recursively

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Sat, 2014-09-27 23:52

If you program in Go, you've probably written a lot of packages, and probably split packages in subpackages. Maybe even more than idiomatic Go would really advise... And you may have been grumbling just like I did at the fact that the go test command requires a list of packages, and does not recursively dive into all the subpackages, like PHPunit would, and does not seem to have a working recursion flag.

Debugging spammer mechanics

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Sun, 2014-07-20 09:40

I've long been receiving quite high volumes of comment spam on this blog, which is why comments have always been pre-moderated. And, of course, there is usually not much to think of it. Not so with one of the spam messages posted today, which unwittingly provided an unexpected insight into the current mechanisms uses by spammers.

Golang tip of the day: admin dashboard and health checks in Beego applications

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Sun, 2014-07-06 12:23

One litle-publicized feature of the BeeGo Go framework is its admin dashboard.

Features

Although it may look quite raw visually (think MIME: text/plain), it contains a wealth of information about goroutines, threads, memory usage, and request statistics. It even allows devs to add to a "healthcheck" list, and admins allowed dashboard access to run "tasks" defined in code. The diagram belows shows the hierarchy of features in the version coming with Beego 1.3.0.

What to do when Go will not run, nor install from source ?

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Fri, 2014-06-06 16:39

Some days ago, at the AWS Summit 2014, DamZ renewed my long-sleeping interest for the Google Go language with wonderous stories about its use in infrastructure of the new Commerce Guys Platform they were launching that same days, so I've been doing my homework getting up to date on Go programming: that's what holidays are for, aren't they ?

Tip of the day: Phing, Composer and namespaced Task classes

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Sat, 2014-02-15 11:43

Among the interesting features of Phing is its extensibility, and of the hallmarks of that exensibility is the ability to define new Task types as PHP classes, which are by default located in the default namespace only. Can we do better ?

Step 0: "Ad-hoc" (inline) tasks

At the simplest, Task classes are created by embedding ad-hoc tasks like:

Tip of the day: Standalone DBTNG outside Drupal

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Sat, 2014-02-08 09:58

A few days ago, while I was writing a bit of Silex code and grumbling at Doctrine DBAL's lack of support for a SQL Merge operation, I wondered if it wouldn't be possible to use DBTNG without the rest of Drupal.

Obviously, although DBTNG is described as having been designed for standalone use: DBTNG should be a stand-alone library with no external dependences other than PHP 5.2 and the PDO database library, in actual use, the Github DBTNG repo has seen no commit in the last 3 years, and the D8 version is still not a Drupal 8 "Component" (i.e. decoupled code), but still a plain library with Drupal dependencies. How would it fare on its own ? Let's give it a try...

Profiling Silex controller actions in the Web Profiler timeline

Submitted by Frederic Marand on Tue, 2014-01-21 22:02

The WebProfilerServiceProvider brings the Symfony Profiler to Silex apps, and with it the nice "Timeline" feature, detailing for each request cycle the time spent handling each event dispatched by the EventDispatcher, from kernel.request to kernel.terminate, with detail time spent in each individual listener.

The timeline looks like this one:

This is all nice and well, but there is a problem with this timeline: although the beginning and end of the request cycle is profiled in depth, it represents less than half of the total time spent for this request.

More than half of the total request time is spent in the controller, and this example does not even perform any database access, which would make the controller represent event more of the total time, making the detailed analysis of the beginning and end of the request cycle less relevant.

What would make sense would be to subdivide the time spent in the controller in much the same way the time spent in the event listeners is already plotted. Is there a simple way ? Sure: let us see how the profiler works.