How to add settings to custom Drupal themes

One feature I used to find missing in Drupal was the builtin ability to have themes include their own settings, like modules do.

For instance, a theme might allow switching renderings on the fly, without needing activation of specific stylesheets, or CSS or code tweaking, just by choosing parameters in an administration UI. But it was impossible. That is, until tonight.

Since a direct implementation in core seemed unlikely to see the day before 4.8/5.0, I created a proof-of-concept module just for this, called "themesettings".

The details and full source are available as a small demo which adds a "background" setting to a variant of the box_grey PHP theme, to define the background color of all nodes on the fly, just by choosing it from admin/themes/settings2/<chosen theme>. To read and download the code involved... :

Speeding up international Drupal versions

Would you like your non-english Drupal site to be more responsive ? I just found two-minute hack to speed it up, by a factor of four on the new Riff hosting. Here's how.

While revising devel.module in order to update the french translation, I noticed the queries performed by locale() took on the order of 20ms to be performed, and there are a whole lot of them on most pages when locale.module is enabled.

Since this seemed abnormally slow, I looked at the structure, and saw why. The current MySQL code goes:

Themeing the search form

In the recently introduced Drupal RC2, a pair of new functions have appeared: theme_search_block_form() and theme_search_theme_form(). They replace the ephemeral (some said "Easter Egg") theme_search_box() appeared and disappeared between RC1 and RC2, and raise important issues for themers.

Ideas for Drupal: trapping obsolete functions

The recent removal of the quasi-official node_validate_title() function from 4.7 causing various errors with contrib modules, I wondered whether there wouldn't be a way to trap such errors in a way that would be helpful to newbies, instead of the current situation where all they get from their newly haphazard drupal install is a PHP fatal error.

The idea, then, is to register obsolete functions in some form of legacy maintenance module, to generate a useful help page pointing the user to a doc page on drupal explaining why there is an error in his configuration and what he should do. In node_validate_title()'s case, the help is a bit succinct: http://drupal.org/node/22218#node_validate_title.